Membership Application / Renewal Form
Gifting / Donating
Members Roll of Arms
Heraldry Proficiency Program
Society Forums
AGM & Conference
Heraldry 4 Kids
Society Shoppe
Alta Studia Heraldica
RHSC's blog
RHSC Facebook
Canadian Heraldic Authority (CHA)

Canadian Heraldic Dictionary

Dictionary entries beginning with the letter A Dictionary entries beginning with the letter B Dictionary entries beginning with the letter C Dictionary entries beginning with the letter D Dictionary entries beginning with the letter E Dictionary entries beginning with the letter F Dictionary entries beginning with the letter G Dictionary entries beginning with the letter H Dictionary entries beginning with the letter I Dictionary entries beginning with the letter J Dictionary entries beginning with the letter K Dictionary entries beginning with the letter L Dictionary entries beginning with the letter M Dictionary entries beginning with the letter N Dictionary entries beginning with the letter O Dictionary entries beginning with the letter P Dictionary entries beginning with the letter Q Dictionary entries beginning with the letter R Dictionary entries beginning with the letter S Dictionary entries beginning with the letter T Dictionary entries beginning with the letter U Dictionary entries beginning with the letter V Dictionary entries beginning with the letter W Dictionary entries beginning with the letter X Dictionary entries beginning with the letter Y Dictionary entries beginning with the letter Z

Term Source Meaning Illustration
Pacific Dogwood - Natural Provincial Flowers of Canada The Pacific Dogwood, shown here in its natural form, is the Provincial flower of British Columbia.
Pacific Dogwood - Heraldic Association of Municipal Chiefs of Police of B.C. Vol VI, P 58 The Pacific Dogwood is the Provincial flower of British Columbia.
Paddle-wheel Steamboat City of Whitehorse. Vol IV, P 253 The Paddle-wheel Steamboat has long been used as a Whitehorse emblem, symbolizing the importance of the vessel in opening up the city and its region.
Palisade Annapolis A fence constructed of stout poles in contact, often sharpened at the tips - a defensive enclosure.
Palladian Window University Club of Toronto. Vol V, P 36 The Palladian style of architecture goes back to the 16th century. The window suggests classical design and its arched shape is an ancient symbol of hospitality.
Pan Pipes McCain As illustrated. Pan Pipes are often used to suggest an interest in music.
Panda Wong Kung Har Wun Sun Association. Vol VI, P 56 The Panda (shown here as the dexter supporter) is an oriental animal, in this case used to represent a Canadian/Chinese association.
Pantheon Canadian Space Agency. Vol II, P 111 The pantheon is an heraldic monster with the body of a hind, the bushy tail of a fox, cloven hooves, and the body completely strewn with mullets or estoiles. In this case, the azure colour and the golden stars suggest a creature of outer space.
Panther HMCS Tecumseh (Badge) Vol V, P 416 The Panther (also known as the puma, cougar or mountain lion) is the largest wildcat in North America.
Parachute Grimshaw, L.E. Vol III 77 The parachute is used in this badge to allude to the grantee's skill as a parachutist.
Passenger Pigeon Notre-Dame-du-Mont-Carmel, PQ. Vol V, P 449 The Passenger Pigeon, now extinct, suggests the importance of recalling our history.
Patten (or Clog) Patten, Lawrence J. Vol II, P 330 Pattens are protective overshoes that were worn in Europe from the Middle Ages to the late 19th century. They were made of wood and held in place with leather bands. The patten shown in these arms is used as a play on the surname of the grantee.
Paw-prints Gibson Paw prints (especially those of the bear) have been used a number of times in Canadian arms, often suggesting a connection with the North or with wild country.
Peach City of Penticton, BC. Vol IV, P 55 The Peach refers to the historic orchard industry of the Penticton area, and to its annual Peach Festival.
Peace Pipe Norquay The peace pipe or calumet is depicted as shown.
Per Saltire Paly Chevronny Dixon, G.L. Vol II, P 200 The shield of these arms is blazoned: Per saltire paly chevronny, in all four chevrons Or and Azure pointing to the centre point.
Enlarge the shield, figure it out word by word and you should never have any future trouble with blazonry!
Peregrine Falcon Wallace, S.G. Vol VI, P286 The Peregrine Falcon is a member of the hawk family. They are powerful, elegant and far-sighted creatures, often rare in numbers, but widespread across the world.
Perpendiculm Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia. Vol I, P 13. The Perpendiculum is an instrument used by early masons and bricklayers to measure a surface's horizontality. It refers in this case to the engineering profession.
Pharmaceutical Symbol for Minim BC Pharmacy Association. Vol II, P 367 In addition to the well-known emblems of pharmacy – the mortar-and-pestle and the balance – this institution has added to its arms the symbol for the Minim (1/60 of a fluid drachm), shown in the sinister chief and on the shoulder of the dexter supporter.This measurement and its symbol were still in use in the early years of the author’s medical practice!
Pharmaceutical Symbol for Ounce BC Pharmacy Association. Vol II, P 367 In addition to the well-known emblems of pharmacy – the mortar-and-pestle and the balance – this institution has added to its arms the symbol for the fluid Ounce (8 fluid drachms), shown in the dexter chief and on the shoulder of the sinister supporter.
Pileated Woodpecker Village of Rockcliffe Park. Vol II, P 333 The Pileated Woodpecker (shown here as the dexter supporter) is the largest surviving woodpecker in North America. It is distinguished by its bright red, pointed crest and by its laugh-like call. In these arms, it alludes to the verdant, forested nature of the park.
Pileated Woodpecker #2 Massé, A., Vol VI, P 329 The Pileated Woodpecker (seen here as a crest) is the largest of the woodpecker family. It is native to most parts of Canada.
Pine Tree McRodan, PW. Vol. V P182 The Northern Pine shown in the crest, typifies the forests of Canada and may refer in general to the outdoor life.
Pitcher Plant - Natural Provincial Flowers of Canada. The Pitcher Plant (shown here in its natural form) is the Provincial flower of Newfoundland and Labrador.
Plains Indian Headdress First Canadian Submarine Squadron, RCN (Badge) Vol II, P 432 The Headdress displayed in this badge, with its impressive fringe of eagle feathers, is typical of that worn by chiefs of the Plains First Nations (consisting mainly of the Cree, Sioux and Blackfoot tribes) at the time of their first contact with Europeans. The headdress is symbolic of leadership and connects to the practice of naming Canadian submarines after First Nations.
Plessis Calder, O.G. Vol IV, P 119 The Plessis, or wattle, is a structure that was commonly found in mediaeval gardens. It is made of a series of posts intertwined with branches or strips of wood and often covered with mud or plaster.
Plough Culter Matheson, M.N. Vol II, P 65 The Plough Culter (or coulter) is the actual working part of a plough - the part that creates the furrow in the soil. It is seen in this crest held by the hand and can be used to allude to agriculture or to a strong work ethic.
Ponderosa Pine City of Kimberley, BC. Vol Iv, P 530 The Ponderosa Pine is native to the Western U.S. and Canada.
Poppy Canadian War Museum (Flag). Vol III, P 340 The Poppy recalls the poppies of Flanders fields. It has been used thereafter to commemorate both world wars and by extension all wars in which Canadians have fought. It thus honours all Service veterans.
Porcupine Edmundston, N.B. Vol VI, P 57 The Porcupine represents the Maliseet tribal name (land of porcupines), for Madawaska County, New Brunswick, in which the town is located.
Potato Plant Village of Drummond, NB. Vol III, P 120 The Potato plant symbolizes the principal resources of the area.
Prairie Crocus - Natural Provincial Flowers of Canada The Prairie Crocus (shown here in its natural form) is the Provincial Flower of Manitoba.
Prairie Crocus - Heraldic Sorobyey, R.B. Vol V, P 328 The Prairie Crocus is the Provincial flower of Manitoba.
Prime Minister (Mark of) M. Brian Mulroney. Vol II, P 370 The Prime Minister’s Mark (four maple leaves conjoined in cross at the stem Gules) is shown at the dexter canton of Mr Mulroney’s arms.
Pronghorn Antelope Province of Alberta The typical small antelope of the prairies.
Pronghorn Antelope #2 University of Alberta. Vol II, P 329 The Pronghorn Antelope (here taken from the arms of Alberta) is native mainly to the grasslands of western Canada and the US. It is the only deer-like animal to have branched horns rather than antlers, and is the fastest land mammal in North America. It is generally symbolic of the Prairies and of speed.
Propeller Holmes, P.D.P. Vol IV, P 306 The propeller, (used here in place of a sword) refers to the grantee's service in the RCAF during the Second World War. The propeller shown is that used in the Lancaster bomber.
Ptarmigan NCC Investment Group. Vol VI, First Nation P1 The Ptarmigan is the Territorial bird of Nunavut.
Puffin Guité, M.J.C. (Crest) Vol V, P 113 The Puffin is bird of the auk family, found primarily in northern ocean areas. It is distinguished by a brightly-coloured beak in the breeding season. The puffin nests in crevices in rocks and cliffs. In these arms it alludes to the Gaspé region of Quebec, from which the grantee’s family originated and where puffins are common in the coastal areas.
Purple Saxifrage - Heraldic Commissioner of Nunavut. Vol V, P 427 The Purple Saxifrage (shown here above the maple leaves) is the Territorial flower of Nunavut.
Purple Saxifrage - Natural NCC Investment Group. Vol VI, First Nations, P1 The Purple Saxifrage (shown here in its natural form) is the Territorial flower of Nunavut.
Purple Violet - Natural Provincial Flowers of Canada. The Purple Violet (shown here in its natural form) is the Provincial flower of New Brunswick.
Purple Violet - Heraldic Edmundston, N.B. Vol VI, P 57 The Purple Violet is the Provincial flower of New Brunswick.